Friend of Boston bomber sentenced to three-and-a-half years for obstruction

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is pictured in this handout photo presented as evidence by the U.S. Attorney's Office in Boston

By Scott Malone BOSTON (Reuters) – A Kazakh exchange student who was friends with the Boston Marathon bomber was sentenced to 3-1/2 years in U.S. federal prison on Friday for removing a backpack containing fireworks from the suspect’s room during a massive manhunt. Azamat Tazhayakov was the second of three friends of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev to be sentenced for going to Tsarnaev’s dorm room three days after the April 2013 bombing, after the FBI released images of Tsarnaev and his older brother, Tamerlan, identifying them as suspects.

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Source:: Yahoo

      

Tips For Choosing The Right Cash Back Credit Cards

Cash back credit cards are one of the most popular of all rewards cards. These credit cards do not award points, miles or other bonuses that can only be redeemed for goods or services, they give you cold hard cash back. With cash your options are limitless, with points you are restricted heavily. each purchase gives you a percentage back as cash back, and you can use this cash however you like.

This card works best if you spend a lot of money during the month. You want a cash back card that rewards you generously for spending when using the card. Some cards offer as much as 6 percent cash back on certain categories, other cards have categories which change every 3 to 4 months. If the card does offer rotating categories you want to make sure that these categories are in areas that you tend to spend money in, for example if you are a man and many of the categories are for women’s clothing stores and places like QVC, chances are this is not the right cash back credit card for you. Cash back for spending in areas like restaurants, gas and purchases from your favorite stores are ideally what you are looking for, if you want to maximize the value of your cash back credit card.

When selecting a cash back card keep in mind the cards fees and any annual membership they may charge. These fees will chip away at the value of your cash back. If you tend to carry a balance from month to month, without paying the balance off on or before the due date, a cash back credit card may not be the best choice for you, since cash back credit cards tend to have higher interest rates. For example lets say you earn $22 dollars cash back, but you have a large credit card balance, and after the payment you make you have several hundred dollars carry over to the next month and get hit with $43 dollars in interest, then the cash back has done nothing for you. Cash back only works to your advantage if you can pay off the balance in full every month and avoid any interest charges.


A good move on your part when looking for a cash back credit card is to wait until they offer a sign up bonus.
Most credit cards run several sign up bonuses per year, so if they are not running a sign up bonus right now, you could simply wait a few months and see if one surfaces, or find another cash back credit card which does offer a sign up bonus in order to maximize the credit cards value.

Having more than one cash back card can make sense if the card uses rotating categories and you want to maximize your cash back rewards. Yet as stated before you should be aware of cards with excessive fees. Also signing up for more than one card at a time can dip your credit score substantially. Applying for multiple lines of credit can be easily seen as a sign to creditors that you have over extended your finances and need to borrow more money, and not a desire to earn more rewards. remember creditors do not know your motivation for applying for credit, so they simply use statistics back by data, and that data says that the majority of people applying for multiple lines of credit at once have a higher chance of defaulting on their financial obligations. If you want to apply for more than one cash back credit card, I would recommend obtaining one then waiting 6 to 8 months before applying for a second card.